Teaching



Current Courses:

Posc 101: (Towson) 


This course introduces students to the fundamental political questions through a survey or major thinkers in Western political theory. Students learn to explain the various answers given by major thinkers in the Western tradition to these questions, state how views about politics have changed over time, and defend the views they find most persuasive. This course prepares students to apply their understanding of the fundamental concepts of political science to future studies in other fields of political science or in more advanced political theory coursework.

Spring 2019 (Two Sections) [Syllabus]
Fall 2018 (Two Sections) [Syllabus]



Phil 240: Ethics (CCBC)


This course examines how to rationally determine the difference between good and bad, rights and wrong, moral and immoral through a survey of various ethical and moral theories and through applications of those theories to hypothetical and contemporary examples.

Spring  2019 [Syllabus]
Fall 2018 [Syllabus]
Spring 2018 (Three Sections) [Syllabus]
Fall 2017 [Syllabus]


 

 

 

Past Courses:

Posc 475: Topics in Political Science Ethics/Revolutions (Towson) 

This course examines how to ethically assess the actions of political leaders and protesters in revolutionary situations. We do so by reading classic texts of political theory and by addressing two contemporary case studies: the 1989 Tienanmen Square Protests and the Egyptian Revolution of 2011. Students write a research paper in which they assess the actions of political leaders and protesters in a revolutionary situation of their choice. 

Fall 2018 [Syllabus



Poli 210: Political Philosophy (UMBC)

This course introduces students to the fundamental political questions through a survey or major thinkers in Western political theory. Students learn to explain the various answers given by major thinkers in the Western tradition to these questions, state how views about politics have changed over time, and defend the views they find most persuasive. This course prepares students to apply their understanding of the fundamental concepts of political science to future studies in other fields of political science or in more advanced political theory coursework. 

Fall 2018 [Syllabus]



Poli 28: Ethics of Civil and Political Society: Leadership and Revolt (UCSD)


This course examines how to ethically assess the actions of political leaders and protesters in revolutionary situations. We do so by reading classic texts of political theory and by addressing two contemporary case studies: the 1989 Tienanmen Square Protests and the Egyptian Revolution of 2011.  


Summer Session II 2016 [Syllabus]
Summer Session II 2014, co-taught with John Lejeune [Syllabus]
Summer Session II 2013, co-taught with John Lejeune [Syllabus]



Poli 140C: International Crisis Diplomacy (UCSD)

This course examines the relationship between diplomacy and foreign policy through an exploration of diplomatic attempts to resolve international crises. The subject is approached from theoretical and historical readings complemented by an simulation that makes use of the board game Diplomacy.

Summer Session I 2016 [Syllabus]



Poli 110EA: American Political Thought Revolution to Civil War (UCSD)


This course examines the political debates of the era from the founding of the Unites States to the outbreak of the Civil War: Independence or no, Federalist or Anti-Federalist, retaining slavery or abolition, and secession or union. We do this by reading the major political and theoretical texts from the period.

Winter 2015 [Syllabus]



Poli 13: Power and Justice: An Introduction to Political Theory (UCSD)


This course provides an introduction to Political Theory. We focus on examining the relationship between political power and justice by read several short canonical works from the history of political thought followed by several essays by important contemporary theorists of liberty. 

Summer Session I 2013 [Syllabus]